Agriculture

AGRICULTURE PRICING, LEASING & CONTRACTS WEBINAR - December 2021

COMMERCIAL PESTICIDE APPLICATOR TRAINING

Commercial Pesticide Applicator Training in Aquatic and Mosquito

Date has passed.

Commercial Pesticide Applicator Training in Right of Way

Date:  Thursday, April 14, 2022

Time:  8:00 am to 4:00 pm

Cost:  $35.00

Location:  Village Center of Waunakee, 333 South Madison St., Waunakee, WI 53597

Event Type:  In Person

This training/review session is for commercial applicators seeking category 6.0 Right of Way certification.

Registration is required to attend.  To register, please go to the UW Pat Store https://patstore.wisc.edu/secure/default.asp and select Right of Way 6.0  For certification you must purchase the base training fee with materials (book, pdf or online course).  You may attend a training but certification will not be processed until the base training fee is paid.

Contact Name:  UW Pat Program

Contact Email:  patprogram@mailplus.wisc.edu

Contact Phone:  608-262-7588

Commercial Pesticide Applicator Training in Field and Vegetable

Date:  Wednesday, March 30, 2022

Time:  8:00 am to 4:00 pm

Cost:  $35.00

Location:  La Sure’s Banquet Center, 3125 South Washburn St., Oshkosh, WI 54904

Event Type:  In person

This training/review session is for commercial applicators seeking category 1.1 Field and Vegetable certification.  Registration is required to attend.  Go to the UW PAT store https://patstore.wisc.edu/secure/default.asp and select Field and Vegetable Crops 1.1.

Contact Email:  patprogram@mailplus.wisc.edu

Phone:  608-262-7588

Commercial Pesticide Applicator Training in Field and Vegetable ZOOM

Date:  Thursday, April 7, 2022

Time:  8:00 am to 2:00 pm

Cost:  $15.00

Event Type:  Virtual/Online

This training/review Zoom webinar is for commercial applicators seeking category 1.1 Field and Vegetable certification.  Registration is required  to attend.  To register, please go to the UW Pat Store (https://patstore.wisc.edu/secure/default.asp) and select Field and Vegetable 1.1.

For certification, you must purchase the base training fee with materials (book, pds or online course).  The certification test will not be provided in this Zoom webinar.  To schedule a test with the WI Department of Agricultural, Trade, and Consumer Protection (DATCP) please go to pestexam.datcp,wi.gov.  To schedule a test with Pearson Vue, please go to home.pearsonvue.com.

Commercial  Pesticide Applicator Training in Turf and Landscape

Date:  Wednesday, March 30, 2022

Time:  8:00 am to 4:00 pm

Cost:  $35.00

Location:  Ingleside Hotel, 2810 Golf Road, Pewaunkee, WI 53072

Event:  In person

This training/review session is for commercial applicators seeking category 3.0  Turf and Landscape certification.  Registration is required to atend.  To register, please go to the UW-Pat Store (https://patstore.wisc.edu/secure/default.asp) and select Turf and Landscape 3.0.

The commercial testing will be provided at the end of the training/review session by the WI Department of Agriculture, Trade, and Consumer Protection.  You will have to give the test proctor your training registration certificate or provide your 3-ticket (phone or printed out) given to you when you received your training materials for certification to be processed.

Commercial Pesticide Applicator Training in Turf and Landscape ZOOM

Dates:  Wednesday, April 20, 2022 – Wednesday, May 18, 2022 (same time)

Time:  8:00 am to 2:00 pm

Cost:  $15.00

Event type:  Virtual/Online

This training/review Zoom webinar is for commercial applicators seeking category 3.0 Turf and Landscape certification.  Registration is required to attend.  To register, go to the UW PAT store (https://patstore.wisc.edu/secure/default.asp) and select Turf and Landscape 3.0.  The certification test will not be provided in this Zoom webinar.  To schedule a test with the WI Department of Agriculture, Trade or Consumer Protection (DATCP) go to pestexam.datcp.wi.gov.

NEW: BADGER DAIRY INSIGHT WEBINARS - January - May 2022

DEVELOP YOUR FARM BUSINESS IDEA USING LEAN START-UP AND BUSINESS MODEL CANVAS

Date:  Friday, April 1, 2022

Time:  11:00 – 12:00 pm

Try to figure out whether your business idea has any merit can be a daunting process.  Business plans take a lot of time and energy to pull together for an idea you may not be sure will succeed.  The Lean Start-Up with Business Model Canvas is a tool and process for discovering the best business model for your idea without investing too many resources.  It is most successfully used as a precursor to the business planning step.  First you ask yourself, “Do  I have a viable idea (business model)?”  If yes, the next step is development of a business plan.  But, there is no reason to go through all the work of a business plan if you don’t have a good and viable business model to start with!  In this session, Extension Specialist, Kevin Bernhardt and Educators, Steph Plaster and Ben Jenkins will walk through examples of how Lean Start-Up with business Model Canvas can be used to stress test a new business enterprise or changes to your current business.

For more information and resources visit:  https://farms.extension.wisc.edu/

Register here:  https://eventactions.com/eareg.aspx?ea=Rsvp

Q&A:  Submit your questions to the speakers prior/during to the program here:   https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSdhhjXd5EXP4HmtodGc8VA06r3V1RBLYe9ynCsg-chEQMqIRg/viewform

STRATEGIC THINKING FOR THE FARM BUSINESS:  PUTTING YOUR FARM VALUES TO WORK

Date:  Friday, April 8, 2022

Time:  11:00 12:00 pm

Strategic thinking is the intuitive, visual, and creative process you use to make decisions about your farm business.  Strategic thinking is all about thinking ahead, anticipating what your competition is going to do, and then taking risks in order to succeed.  Our values shape how we make the day to day and long-term decisions that affect our business and our future.  Being able to define exactly what our personal, family, and business values are, allows us to more clearly understand our WHY – or what’s behind what motivates us and drives us to make decisions, accomplish goals, and be successful.  In this session, Extension Educator Steph Plaster will explore how to craft your values and put them to work in order to design your future rather than let the future happen to you.  For more information and resources visit:  https://farms.extension.wisc.edu/

Q&A:  Submit your questions to the speakers prior/during to the program here:  https://forms.gle/7hh5KwAXZHuyhUgj9

Register here:  https://eventactions.com/eareg.aspx?ea=Rsvp

CULTIVATING PERSONAL STRENGTH AND RESILIENCE:  WE-COPE FOR FARMERS AND AGRICULTURE

Date:  Friday, April 22, 2022

Time:  11AM – 12PM

This 60 minute session will explore a sampling of activities and skills that research shows can dramatically reduced personal stress, improve physical health, and cultivate a sense of peace and well-being even for those who live and work in the busy and unpredictable world of agriculture.  Whether you are a farm operator, manager, employee, or other professional connected to the ag industry, the We-COPE Program draws from clinical research studies about actions that are shown to make a difference in our lives, relationships, decision making and sense of well-being.  Extension Specialists, John Shutske and Educator, Amands Corough, will demonstrate skills that can be built into our daily lives and busy routines without a great deal of effort or time.  This program builds on and amplifies the strengths and skills that people associated with farming already tend to do well and practice regularly.

For more information and resources visit:  https://farms.extension.wisc.edu/

Q&A:  Submit your questions to the speakers prior/during to the program here: https://forms.gle/qSrVfTnv1xLDqMKe6

Register here:  https://eventactions.com/eareg.aspx?ea=Rsvp

NEW: SMALL RUMINANTS WEBINARS - January - May 2022

SRW – ALL ABOUT ARLINGTON

Date:  Tuesday, May 10, 2022

Time:  7:30 – 8:30 pm

Join Todd Taylor, the University of Wisconsin-Madison Sheep Research Program Manager at the Arlington Agricultural Research Station Sheep Unit, and Extension Educators for an in-depth look into sheep research, teaching, and extension activities and events at the Arlington Agricultural Research Station.

Register here:  https://eventactions.com/eareg.aspx?ea=Rsvp

Private Pesticide Training

Wi Badger Crop Connect

Why Use Cover Crops?

 

Written by Greg Blonde, UW-Extension, Agricultural Agent, Waupaca County and Jamie Patton, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, UW-Madison Reduced Erosion: An obvious effect of growing cover crops is covering the soil surface, which can significantly reduce the potential for wind and water erosion. This is particularly true when precipitation and/or winds are intense and traditional cash crops aren’t actively growing, such as in early spring and late fall. Plant residue, both living and dead, is critical to minimize the impact of rainfall and wind on soil erosion. The estimated amount of residue remaining after corn harvest is often in the 75 to 90 percent range. However, depending on the region and conditions, fields can lose up to 40 percent or more of their residue cover during the winter.  This loss leaves the field more susceptible to erosion during heavy and intense spring rains. Depending on the species grown the planting method, and days of growth, cover crops have the potential to increase soil cover to almost 90 to 100 percent during times of the year when fields are most susceptible to erosion. Minimizing soil erosion to around 100 pounds will lead to an increase in soil depth because the rate of soil formation is greater than the rate of soil loss. Greater soil depth, in turn, results in greater soil and crop production resiliency, sustainability, and productivity. In addition to adding aboveground plant material, the root systems of cover crops help hold the soil in place and reduce erosion. Many soil health advocates recommend planting several species of crops in a single planting to capitalize on species’ differences in the root architecture (think taproot vs. fibrous root systems, shallow vs. deep-rooted plants). They argue that the diversity in root system growth will help hold soil in place, create pore space, scavenge and recycle nutrients and water, and move carbon deep within the soil profile. Increased Soil Organic Matter: Soil organic matter plays several beneficial roles, including enhanced aggregation and aggregate stability, increased soil fertility, and greater biological activity. Increased soil organic matter typically results in an increase in biological activity and the production of organic glues that hold soil aggregates together. Glomalin, a glycoprotein secreted by mycorrhizal fungi, is believed to be one of the primary organic glues for bonding and stabilizing aggregates. The benefits of increased soil aggregation with increased soil organic matter trickle down, leading to increased pore space, improved water infiltration, and reduced runoff, as well as increased water-holding capacity, gaseous exchange, root growth, and microbial activity. Although the concept of soil aggregation seems quite straightforward, farmers’ perspectives on the impact of cover crops on aggregation and soil water dynamics may appear contradictory. Farmers report that increased soil organic matter leads to greater water-holding capacity, yet their fields are drier and can be worked/planted earlier in the spring.  Large pores move water and air through the soil, while small pores hold water. The use of cover crops increases both sizes of pores. Root channels, worm channels, and an increased number of larger aggregates increase the number of large pores in a soil, draining away excess, saturating water. The increase in soil organic matter associated with cover crops also increases the number of smaller aggregates within the soil matrix. These smaller aggregates store up to approximately 25,000 gallons of plant-available water per acre per 1 percent organic matter. The combination of large and small pores allows soil to drain excess water properly and introduces oxygen back into the root zone, while simultaneously holding additional plant-available water.  Increasing soil organic matter by only a percentage point or two can have a huge impact on the ability of that soil to support crop growth in times of water stress—both too much and too little. Soil organic matter also increases cation-exchange capacity (CEC), which is the soil’s ability to hold and supply nutrients over time. With an increase in CEC, more nutrients are stored in the soil profile, leading to a decrease in nutrient loss. Increased CEC also improves the soil’s buffering capacity (ability to resist change), providing a more chemically stable environment for plants and microbes. Additionally, soil organic matter is itself a source of nutrients for plants, particularly nitrogen. As organic matter is decomposed, nutrients become dissolved and available for plant uptake. Predictions of the amount of nutrients released from soil organic matter are complicated, but research is underway to quantify the amount of nitrogen we can expect to come from our soils. Improved Nitrogen Cycling: Cover crops can be used to capture available soil nitrogen, which is stored in previous crop plant tissue. This helps decrease nitrogen leaching. Once the cover crop is terminated and starts to decompose, this nitrogen is released back into the soil system where it can be used by the subsequent crop. A study in Oregon’s Willamette Valley found that a cereal rye cover crop reduced nitrate leaching by 32 to 42 percent over a three-year period, as compared to fallow.  Such reductions in nutrient leaching not only reduce the fertilizer requirements in the year following the cover crop, but protect ground and surface water quality as well. Legume cover crops such as peas, vetches, and clovers can “fix” nitrogen from the atmosphere. Legumes are estimated to contribute anywhere from 40 to 200 pounds of nitrogen per acre. Current research into nitrogen fixation may help farmers utilize legumes more effectively in their rotations.   The rate and amount of nitrogen released from a cover crop is a direct result of the cover crop’s carbon to nitrogen (C: N) ratio. Microbes decomposing the cover crop like to maintain a 8:1 C: N ratio. When plant residue is added to the soil, the population of soil organisms increases to take advantage of the added food source. However, if the residue is relatively low in nitrogen, the microbes consume more nitrogen from the soil system to maintain their 8:1 C: N ratio.  As a result, this nitrogen is temporarily unavailable for plant use until the microbes die. As the microbes decompose, nitrogen is released back into the soil system, making it plant-available again. Residues with low C:N ratios, such as legumes and young plant tissues, typically does not result in immobilization but often release nitrogen back into the plant-available pool quickly. In fact, legume nitrogen can be quickly mineralized, sometimes even before the subsequent crop has a high demand for it. Achieving synchrony of nitrogen release from decomposing residues and crop nitrogen demand is difficult, but can be achieved through effective timing of cover crop termination and an ideal mixture of cover crop species to spread nitrogen mineralization over the growing season. Growing mixtures of quickly mineralized cover crops (legumes and some brassicas) with slowly mineralized cover crops (the grasses) can often achieve this goal.. Enhanced Soil Biology: We’re just starting to realize how important large and small soil organisms are to soil health and diverse population of microorganisms.  Soil organisms play an important role in decomposition.  By growing cover crops and improving soil physical and chemical properties, farmers can enhance the microbial populations found in their soils and reap the benefits of a functioning, diverse soil ecosystem.  These benefits include nutrient recycling, residue degradation, and pore and aggregate creations, among others. Suppress Weeds: Cover crops can be used to suppress weed growth through:
  • Promotion of a weed’s natural enemies, such as seed predators and pathogens
  • Physical suppression (i.e., mulch) to reduce weed seed germination and growth
  • Allelopathy or chemical inhibition to reduce weed seed germination and growth
  • Competition for space, nutrients, and light to reduce weed growth and seed production
Cover crops planted for weed suppression should be aggressive growers that cover the ground quickly, shading the ground to prevent or suppress weed seedling growth. Cereal rye, hairy vetch and red clover are well-known for their quick growth and ability to suppress weeds. The impact of cover crops on weed suppression can be enhanced through proper species selection; timely establishment appropriate seeding rates; and proper row spacing, fertilization, and use of no-till techniques. Insect Support/Succession: Manipulation of cover crops for the control of insect pests is not as simple as it sounds. The underlying principle is to attract beneficial insects and repel pests. However, cover crops may provide both beneficial and pest insects with a supplemental food source and/or shelter. In fact, some insect pests, such as armyworms, wireworms, seed corn maggots, slugs, and white grubs are attracted to the high residue cover of cover-cropped fields in early spring and can become a crop production issue. Insecticides, both surface applied and seed treatments, are often effective in controlling these pests. It is important to note that soil arthropods, springtails, and other soil insects also benefit from cover crops. These small soil dwellers help in organic matter decomposition and serve as predators, keeping microscopic organisms in check while aiding in nutrient cycling. The role of cover crops in insect support and suppression has not been fully researched, but anecdotal accounts support the role they can play in enhancing pest control.  

 

Wisconsin Cash Rent by County

Farm Rent and Land Leases

Contact Information:

Michael Geissinger, Regional Crops Educator

Email:  michael.geissinger@wisc.edu

Ryan Sterry, Regional Dairy Educator

Email:  ryan.sterry@wisc.edu

Kim Grover, Administrative Assistant

Barron County Extension Office

Barron County Government Center, Room 2206

335 E. Monroe Avenue

Barron, WI 54812

Phone:  715-537-6250